School History & Alumni

Shaftesbury Park School was built in 1877 as an integral part of the Shaftesbury Estate named after Lord Shaftesbury and designed by the Artisans, Labourers and General Dwellings Company.

From 1842 there was much legislation in Parliament that attempted to improve the appalling living conditions of many of the poorest of the working classes. This company was one of the largest, most successful and best which, in the surge of building between 1865 and 1905 met the contemporary housing demand and, for a brief respite, left London without a housing shortage.

Lord Shaftesbury entered Parliament in 1826 as a Tory and succeeded to the title in 1851. He strongly supported factory legislation designed to improve the lot of the workers and was largely responsible for the Act of 1842 forbidding the employment of women and children in mines. Lord Shaftesbury was associated with the movement for the establishment of the ragged schools.

Shaftesbury Park School was originally designed for 1,101 children but by 1882 it was housing 1,500! We have to wonder where they put them all!

The original building housed Infants on the ground floor, Junior Girls in the middle and Junior Boys on the top floor, with three Headteachers in residence! The two junior schools were merged into one at some unknown date, possibly in the fifties, but there were still separate infant and junior schools up until l985 when the school became an Infant and Junior Mixed Primary school under one Headteacher.

If you attended our school many years ago, we would love to hear from you to include on our new Alumni page! Please complete the following box with your memories of the school and we will publish it on our website!

Comments:

  1. Joshua Olomo said on 13th August 2014 at 11:29 am

    This school forged the foundation of my ambitions to become a barrister. It’s an amazing school, a school I would send my own children to.

  2. Nicola King said on 11th September 2014 at 10:40 pm

    I was a pupil between 1978 and 1983, Mr Holgate was the Head. Mr Sykes was my year 5 and year 6 teacher. It was a wonderful school! I became a nurse and have had a very successful career and now run my own business. I particularly loved music and was in the choir, and in the school plays. I sang “my old man said follow the van” in our old time musical and came second in a regional met police disco dancing competition. Happy days!

  3. Gerald Holderness said on 26th November 2014 at 7:32 pm

    I was a pupil between 1959 and 1964. I remember 2 head teachers, Mr Loftus and a woman whose name escapes me. Teachers included Mr Lampard, Mrs Maunder, and Mr Bates. The caretaker’s son was in my class, I think his name was Loft?
    I want on to attend Henry Thornton grammar school with my friend Reggie.
    I remember some fellow pupils including Gary Shadbolt (who went on to be an Olympic weightlifter)
    I have good memories of a very good school.

  4. Susan King (nee Evans) said on 12th December 2014 at 2:53 pm

    I was a pupil at this School from 1959 to 1966 many happy memories !! Very strict teachers and head teachers but they encouraged me to be the best I could be ! My favorite teacher was Mr Gear

  5. Iain Johnstone said on 17th January 2015 at 8:57 pm

    I attended SP between 1950 and 1956 – passed the 11+ and went on to Wandsworth School. My teachers were Mrs House, Mrs Smith, Mr Lampard and Mr Batlee. The education I received at SP provided a secure grounding for further progress and it is something for which I am most grateful. I was invited to return in 1969 after I got my first degree and with a new wife for the Christmas spectacular!
    Thank you SP – frequently in my thoughts.

  6. Steve Hooper said on 17th April 2015 at 10:08 am

    I was a pupil here from 1956ish to 1961ish – passed 11+ and went on to Spencer Park in Wandsworth.
    The head teacher in my days was Mr Loftus, I also remember Mrs Maunder, Mr Batlee & Mr Lampard.
    I remember having a school holiday at Marchants Hill Camp near Hindhead.
    Some fellow pupils names I remember include David Bacchus, Stephen Gould, Carol Wright (I think), Roger Innes, Alan Lewis & Roger Austin.
    I can see many more faces in my mind but I can’t put names to them.
    It’s good to see that the old place is still going strong.
    I’ve only got very happy memories of my time there.
    Thank you Shaftesbury Park:-)

  7. Cliff Harden said on 11th December 2015 at 11:47 am

    Hello

    Would really like to add myself to your Alumni. I joined the nursery class in 1974, I was 4 years old and was coupled up with my classroom budy and now good friend…Leo Butterfield. Our teacher for two years was a Miss Walker, very wonderful teacher who had time for all and managed to put up with Leo and my own misbehaviour. I enjoyed my schooling. I remember, Leo, Mark Richards, Tyrone Henry, Nic Bolton, the bros Fullers, Mark Pussey, Paul Lockwood, Rebecca Lacy, Colin Coppard, Gina and friend Nicola. Tracey Tester, Bernedete Powell, Rodney Panton, Tim Murphy, Alexander Fielding,…I could go on and on! Fantastic days. Teachers..Mr Mountain, Miss Davis, Miss Hemming, Mr Pollard and Head teacher Mrs Kinoy. And of course our lovely Dinner Ladies, June Russell and the clan.

  8. Andrew Walker said on 21st January 2016 at 9:10 pm

    I attended Shaftsbury park Infants school between 1972 & 1974, before my parents moved to Vauxhall. I still have fond memories of friends & teachers, the school nativity play and lots of interesting people who brought things into the school to show the children. Including an early synthesiser, birds of prey and interesting animals. I have gone on to live a fulfilling life and have children of my own, now living in Berkshire. It’s interesting to read of Lord Shaftsbury and his commitment to the welfare of the poor. Great school with many memories.

  9. Erica Cusick said on 1st March 2016 at 4:26 pm

    My great-grandfather went to this school; he entered the school aged 8 in 1884 and lived in the house next door (no. 37) for a while! He went on to become a surveyor. It’s lovely to see it still exists.

  10. Peter Teague said on 22nd July 2016 at 11:00 am

    My brother and I attended the school at the beginning (1940 blitz time) and the end of the war from 1943 onwards. He went on to Battersea Polytechnic and I went to Henry Thornton school. A long time ago now but I think I remember a Mr Nash as a teacher. I have only happy recollections of those years despite the doodle bugs and bomb sites around us.

  11. Sally Pope nee Evans said on 26th September 2016 at 8:24 pm

    I attended SP school from 1962 to Nov 1966. I have vivid memories of the pretty terrible outside toilets!!! I would never go in there!! I can remember my first day at school so clearly. Sat next to a girl called Molly and we played with a wooden puzzle together…. I cannot remember the name of the girls headmistress but I believe Mr Lotus was the boys head teacher and Mr Lampard was the deputy head teacher. My brother was 6 years older than me and had cerebral palsy. A lot of times he was in a wheelchair. Mr Lotus and Mr Lampard would carry him in his wheelchair up the steps into school so he could attend…amazing. I remember having to go and read to the headmistress every week and if you read well, you got a boiled sweet! I also remember the caretaker with a bucket of sawdust , sprinkling it over any childs vomit in the classroom or corridor!!!! Why were children always sick then??? Can also remember a junior class going on a holiday together…so all the rest of the school were given sheets of paper each, gathered at the rear windows of the school and waited to wave like mad at the train travelling from Clapham Junction, carrying the children going on holiday. They also had pieces of paper and were waving back at us! It was so exciting. Another memory is of taking a few pennies to school to buy a daffodil bulbs which we took home and grew in a pot till it bloomed in the spring. We then took it back to school on a special day where all the daffodils were judged and given 1st, 2nd or 3rd price certificates…it was lovely. Wonderful school plays and nativities…happy days..happy memories…thanks SP..
    PS Visited there recently and a lovely lady let me in on a Saturday and showed me the ground floor…I was able to see my first classroom…it had hardly changed. Very emotional xxxx

  12. Kay Hillam (nee Quincey) said on 24th October 2016 at 9:57 pm

    I attended Shaftesbury Park school between 1958-64. I remember some wonderful teaching staff. Mr Loftus was the head, Mrs Saville was head of the infants’ school. Mr. Lampard, Mr Gear, Mrs. Maunder, Mr. Batley and many other great teachers who left their mark on me as a young person. Such wonderful memories of a lovely school. I went onto Clapham County. I would love to attend a school reunion from that period if enough people are interested.

  13. Martin Ray said on 25th November 2016 at 10:39 am

    I was at Shaftesbury Park between 1950 and 1956.
    I remember Mr Lampard, Mr Gear and Mr Batley very fondly.
    Along with Keith Chambers and Keith Percival I went on to Emanuel School.
    An opportunity to visit the school or a reunion would be great.

  14. Steve Lucas said on 25th November 2016 at 12:40 pm

    I attended Shaftsbury parks school from 1960 -1966. Mr lofts was the head teacher. I remember Mr Gear, Mr Lampard and Mrs Bidwell.
    The school football team played at Battersea Park. Playing on ashes I recall, it was like playing at Wembley to me. I am sure it was Mr Lampard that took us for sports. what lovely memories. It seemed such a long walk from school to Queenstown road where I lived, and reluctantly,sometimes I used to get in the sidecar of my class mate Daniel Kennedy’s dads motor bike to save the walk it scared the living day lights out of me. Amanda Mears and Barbra Kappa I also remember as class mates. I used too look out the classroom window and see the trains passing in particular the Brighton bell which was always bang on time. Absolutely adored the school and the teachers. Mr Loftus used to allow me and a class mate to deliver internal post to Wixes Lane, Latchmere and John Burns schools felt so grown up. Such happy times it always seemed like summer back then.

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